An interview with Ilaria Ramelli on universal salvation in the early church

Last week I recorded an interview with Ilaria Ramelli on her work on apokatastasis (the restoration of all things to God) in early Christianity.

Here it is:

Comments

Keen Reader said…
Her book is a snip at only US$328.70 per copy!
Robin Parry said…
Indeed! But the interview is free and the pop version of the book (out next year, d.v.) will be considerably cheaper.
Terry Wright said…
I misread your comment as including the phrase 'pop-up version of the book', Robin. There are too few theology pop-up books out there. Perhaps Wipf and Stock should do some.
young and rested said…
I second that Terry. Bring on the pop-up books. What better way to reach the masses...
Robin Parry said…
Terry,

Great idea.
young and rested said…
Does anyone know how soon can we pre-order the pop version of her book?
Robin Parry said…
I know. You won't be able to pre-order it. It will only appear to order once it is published. That'll still be a while off (the ms is still not quite complete)
jmbonnett1 said…
Thank you for this interview Robin. As someone who has been exposed to two of her books it was a pleasure to get a sense of the person behind the prose. John
jmbonnett1 said…
Thinking about it after hearing the interview yesterday, I find myself wondering about two questions:

(a) Why did the translator(s) of the time opt to translate aionios to aeternas? Why were they oblivious to the temporal connotation of the term while the patristic scholars were not?

(b) Is it possible that the term "aeternas" has or had a wide range of meaning, one that connoted a very long time AND an infinity of time, depending on context and use.

John
Loza said…
She is utterly delightful! A ball of energy bursting at the seams. Thank you Robin. Looking forward to more of Ilaria, perhaps another interview or two?
Robin Parry said…
John,

I am not a Latin person, so I am not the one to ask.

My educated guess is that there was not a Latin equivalent of aionios, so the concepts of aionios and aidios could not be distinguished with a simple word. Both were translated with aeternitas, meaning "eternal." For those, like Augustine, who spoke Latin, but were crap at Greek, the Bible then seemed to clearly teach eternal punishment.

On (b) you'd need to ask a Latin scholar. Sorry.

Robin
TN said…
Thank you, Robin, for that interview. That was so refreshing.
And for the 3rd time in my life, I have to revise the way I say the word apokatastasis!
aPOKa-TAS-tasis.
Alex Smith said…
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alex Smith said…
A friend did a summary of the interview here.
Anonymous said…
Very nice interview. More interviews from scholars would be great for the site. Thanks Robin. -Glenn
joy said…
There are things in our life that is not eternal thus we stand still and never show weaknesses. This only means that we are strong enough to face everything either it is big or small. Visit my site for more good vibes and inspirational thoughts. Good day!

n8fan.net

www.n8fan.net

Popular Posts